Click here to find out more!Student renders Alfa build this ‘6C’ supercar. Should Alfa build it?

It is in fact, a design study by a chap called Alex Imnadze, a student of the highly regarded IED Torino (who were 2005 winners of the Ferrari World Design Contest and runners up in 2011), and proud fan of Alfa and Pininfarina’s rich design heritage.

He says he cooked up this rendering - which is no way real at all, unless you’re in The Matrix - as a competitor for the new Chevrolet Corvette; “an Italian muscle car, if it’s possible to say”, he tells us.

And it certainly looks striking. Front-engined (no word, probably the 450bhp 4.7-litre V8), rear-wheel-drive and with hints of the Alfa Romeo Montreal at the front, together with snippets of the rather delectable Alfa 2uettottanta concept, the gorgeous 8C and of course, the original Alfa Romeo 6C. Shame there’s no whisper of the bite-the-back-of-your-hand beautiful Alfa 33 Stradale, but we’ve always got the upcoming 4C for that.

Have a click through the pictures and let us know: reckon Alfa should build something like this 6C?

Permalink  |  474 notes  |   #alfa romeo   #6c   #supercar   #cars   #top gear  

Here it is: the new Chevrolet Corvette

America, arise. Here’s your newly-minted hero. And Europe, you can forget your old-world snobbishness. America’s great sports car is today re-born. It’s recognisably a Corvette, but its every component has had a hard-reset. If you want your hammering front-engined V8 rumble to come wrapped in the iridescent technologies of our age, you’ve come to the right place.
Brutal statistics first. It makes 450bhp and 450 torques from its all-new V8, and cracks 60mph from rest in under four smokin’ seconds. Chevy people are so pleased with this, they’ve slapped on a badge historically reserved for some of the most knee-trembling Vettes of all. Yes, this one’s a Stingray.
And that name, and those numbers, are just for the base model. What sort of craziness they’ll unleash for the later ‘performance’ versions we can only begin to imagine.


Get all the details at BBC Top Gear

Here it is: the new Chevrolet Corvette

America, arise. Here’s your newly-minted hero. And Europe, you can forget your old-world snobbishness. America’s great sports car is today re-born. It’s recognisably a Corvette, but its every component has had a hard-reset. If you want your hammering front-engined V8 rumble to come wrapped in the iridescent technologies of our age, you’ve come to the right place.

Brutal statistics first. It makes 450bhp and 450 torques from its all-new V8, and cracks 60mph from rest in under four smokin’ seconds. Chevy people are so pleased with this, they’ve slapped on a badge historically reserved for some of the most knee-trembling Vettes of all. Yes, this one’s a Stingray.

And that name, and those numbers, are just for the base model. What sort of craziness they’ll unleash for the later ‘performance’ versions we can only begin to imagine.

Get all the details at BBC Top Gear

Sad news — The Jaguar C-X75 is no more

It is with great regret that we have to inform you of the death of the Jaguar C-X75. The British hybrid supercar, first seen at the Paris Motorshow in 2010, and which you can listen to here, was due to enter production next year, the firm intending to build 250 cars each costing close to £1 million.
That now won’t happen, and economic reasons are to blame, principally the fact that Jaguar no longer believes it can make an “adequate return on investment”.
Linked to that, inevitably, is the current global economic situation. “By the time we got to market with this, we expected normality to have returned”, said brand director Adrian Hallmark, “and even though we could carry on and could fund it, it’s not a major part of our investment. When we look at the global environment and the austerity and the difficulties being faced out there, to bring to market an £800,000-£1 million supercar just feels wrong”.

The good news, however, is that development of the powertrain — including the insane turbines — will continue. For more deets, visit TopGear.com

Sad news — The Jaguar C-X75 is no more

It is with great regret that we have to inform you of the death of the Jaguar C-X75. The British hybrid supercar, first seen at the Paris Motorshow in 2010, and which you can listen to here, was due to enter production next year, the firm intending to build 250 cars each costing close to £1 million.

That now won’t happen, and economic reasons are to blame, principally the fact that Jaguar no longer believes it can make an “adequate return on investment”.

Linked to that, inevitably, is the current global economic situation. “By the time we got to market with this, we expected normality to have returned”, said brand director Adrian Hallmark, “and even though we could carry on and could fund it, it’s not a major part of our investment. When we look at the global environment and the austerity and the difficulties being faced out there, to bring to market an £800,000-£1 million supercar just feels wrong”.

The good news, however, is that development of the powertrain — including the insane turbines — will continue. For more deets, visit TopGear.com

Permalink  |  107 notes  |   #Jaguar   #Jaguar C X75   #C X75   #supercar   #cars   #concept car   #top gear  

Hammond’s Car of the Year: Pagani Huayra


“My Car of the Year is not going to revolutionise personal transport, reinvent motorsport or solve the looming energy crisis. It is a machine so unlikely ever to be a real, material presence in most of our lives that it may as well be a unicorn. And there it is: the Pagani Huayra. Perhaps unicorn is the best way to describe it…
Well, someone had to nominate the Huayra. And Richard – being someone who embraces guilt-free boyish excitement – fell in love with the most outrageous car of 2012. A car that not only represents the cutting edge of car technology, but the poster-possible styling that comes from the beautiful mind of Horacio Pagani. In this month’s Top Gear magazine, Richard finally gets a chance to play with the Huayra around our deserted Dunsfold track, and it’s fair to say he comes away impressed. And the scent of tortured tyres attracts a certain white-suited individual…


Watch video of Hammond in the Hurhaugharah at TopGear.com

Hammond’s Car of the Year: Pagani Huayra

“My Car of the Year is not going to revolutionise personal transport, reinvent motorsport or solve the looming energy crisis. It is a machine so unlikely ever to be a real, material presence in most of our lives that it may as well be a unicorn. And there it is: the Pagani Huayra. Perhaps unicorn is the best way to describe it…

Well, someone had to nominate the Huayra. And Richard – being someone who embraces guilt-free boyish excitement – fell in love with the most outrageous car of 2012. A car that not only represents the cutting edge of car technology, but the poster-possible styling that comes from the beautiful mind of Horacio Pagani. In this month’s Top Gear magazine, Richard finally gets a chance to play with the Huayra around our deserted Dunsfold track, and it’s fair to say he comes away impressed. And the scent of tortured tyres attracts a certain white-suited individual…

Watch video of Hammond in the Hurhaugharah at TopGear.com

May’s Car of the Year: McLaren 12C Spider

James May is a fan of good design and an even bigger exponent of excellence in engineering: two things he found in abundance in the new McLaren 12C Spider – a convertible that neatly beheads the usual arguments against convertible cars by being as perfectly dynamic as the coupe version. Except with a mighty sunroof. Driving the car exclusively for TG mag along the highest paved road in Europe, James discovered that the 12C Spider was:
“Perhaps the most benign supercar I’ve ever tried. Some would want to be admired for their courage in mastering a Ferrari GTO or that demanding Lamborghini Aventador, but I say cobblers to that. I can challenge myself by learning to play the violin. This is a good-time car and I want a good time. I get it.”

For video of James May in the McLaren 12C, visit TopGear.com

May’s Car of the Year: McLaren 12C Spider

James May is a fan of good design and an even bigger exponent of excellence in engineering: two things he found in abundance in the new McLaren 12C Spider – a convertible that neatly beheads the usual arguments against convertible cars by being as perfectly dynamic as the coupe version. Except with a mighty sunroof. Driving the car exclusively for TG mag along the highest paved road in Europe, James discovered that the 12C Spider was:

“Perhaps the most benign supercar I’ve ever tried. Some would want to be admired for their courage in mastering a Ferrari GTO or that demanding Lamborghini Aventador, but I say cobblers to that. I can challenge myself by learning to play the violin. This is a good-time car and I want a good time. I get it.”

For video of James May in the McLaren 12C, visit TopGear.com

Top Gear pits the 1974 Lancia Stratos against the New Stratos. Gorgeous photography ensues. 
Click for more.

Top Gear pits the 1974 Lancia Stratos against the New Stratos. Gorgeous photography ensues.

Click for more.

Permalink  |  249 notes  |   #top gear   #car   #cars   #supercar   #lancia   #stratos   #lancia stratos   #classic car  

Top Gear First Drive: The new Aston Martin Vanquish

The latest Bond film, Skyfall, opens next week, and the word is that it’s right up there in the Bond movie pantheon. An all-time classic, in fact. It also features a lustrously shot, Scottish highlands-set climax in which the Aston Martin DB5 features prominently. It’s the Bond car to end all Bond cars.

I loved, and still love, the original Vanquish, flawed as it was. The DBS that Daniel Craig debuted in Casino Royale was a bit quixotic too, and needed to be manhandled down the road in a way that was more of an extraordinary rendition than a drive in a car. But what both cars had was incredible, almost tangible charisma. You would congratulate yourself on your excellent good fortune every time you stepped out of the house and into either one….

Read on for more

TopGear.com drives the Ferrari F12 Berlinetta

Click through for impressions

McLaren MP4-12C Spider revealed
After speculation last week, we can confirm that the next chapter in the What Car Will McLaren Make Next? saga is one hundred percent the McLaren MP4-12C Spider. And look at it, it’s stunning. And to answer your question - yes. It’s got the more powerful 616bhp, 3.8-litre twin-turbo V8. And yes, it’ll do over 200mph - but only 204mph, 3mph slower than it’s closed-roof sibling. Even so, hairpiece owner will need some stickier glue as the Spider does 0-60mph in 3.1 seconds - the same time as the coupe. The Spider uses a variation of the coupe’s carbon-fibre MonoCell chassis. This 75kg tub requires no additional strengthening for it to feature in the 12C Spider and because of its F1 techyness, it means that the car is almost identical to its fixed roof counterpart in the performance department.
Did we mention that it’s stunning?
Read the rest at TopGear.com

McLaren MP4-12C Spider revealed

After speculation last week, we can confirm that the next chapter in the What Car Will McLaren Make Next? saga is one hundred percent the McLaren MP4-12C Spider. And look at it, it’s stunning.

And to answer your question - yes. It’s got the more powerful 616bhp, 3.8-litre twin-turbo V8. And yes, it’ll do over 200mph - but only 204mph, 3mph slower than it’s closed-roof sibling. Even so, hairpiece owner will need some stickier glue as the Spider does 0-60mph in 3.1 seconds - the same time as the coupe.

The Spider uses a variation of the coupe’s carbon-fibre MonoCell chassis. This 75kg tub requires no additional strengthening for it to feature in the 12C Spider and because of its F1 techyness, it means that the car is almost identical to its fixed roof counterpart in the performance department.

Did we mention that it’s stunning?

Read the rest at TopGear.com

Permalink  |  258 notes  |   #McLaren MP4-12C   #mclaren   #spider   #supercar   #car   #cars  

How not to drive a Lamborghini.

Dear fans of Top Gear.

If you’ve watched enough of our episodes, you should understand that there is a way to drive on a track, and a completely different way to drive on public roads.

If you have trouble understanding why, please take a moment to watch the above instructional video (jump to 0:40 for the lesson).