VW celebrates Swiss Knife multifunction-ness with multifunction Ups.
You know, for the Geneva Motor Show:

Celebrating the motor show’s host nation is the Swiss Up concept,  designed to show how versatile the city car really is. And that  versatility is reflected in a special pouch behind each front seat that  stores the famous knife. Oh, and some red paint with white door mirror  housings.
The Winter Up concept is based on the Cross Up - first seen at  Frankfurt - featuring snowboards on the roof, and a white and blue  livery. It gets a higher ride height and greater underbody protection to  help navigate its snowier destiny.
Next is the X Up, equipped for night time expeditions. For this,  read, it’s got a roof box with built in searchlights. Your ‘night time’  expeditions will not go unnoticed, mind, thanks to its Burnt Orange  paint scheme.
Finally, there’s Cargo Up concept, which features a 1,400-litre  storage capacity. It is the Transit of the Up range. It too benefits  from a raised ride height and underbody protection - to help tackle pot  holed streets - while the rear seats have been binned to allow that  cavernous load space.

Think you can imagine your own special edition Up? TopGear.com wants you to photoshop your own and send them the results. From there, they’ll post their favs. Details here.

VW celebrates Swiss Knife multifunction-ness with multifunction Ups.

You know, for the Geneva Motor Show:

Celebrating the motor show’s host nation is the Swiss Up concept, designed to show how versatile the city car really is. And that versatility is reflected in a special pouch behind each front seat that stores the famous knife. Oh, and some red paint with white door mirror housings.

The Winter Up concept is based on the Cross Up - first seen at Frankfurt - featuring snowboards on the roof, and a white and blue livery. It gets a higher ride height and greater underbody protection to help navigate its snowier destiny.

Next is the X Up, equipped for night time expeditions. For this, read, it’s got a roof box with built in searchlights. Your ‘night time’ expeditions will not go unnoticed, mind, thanks to its Burnt Orange paint scheme.

Finally, there’s Cargo Up concept, which features a 1,400-litre storage capacity. It is the Transit of the Up range. It too benefits from a raised ride height and underbody protection - to help tackle pot holed streets - while the rear seats have been binned to allow that cavernous load space.

Think you can imagine your own special edition Up? TopGear.com wants you to photoshop your own and send them the results. From there, they’ll post their favs. Details here.

Mini Reveals New Roadster (pics)

If you have a portrait of Sir Alec Issigonis hanging in your shed, best look away now. The new Mini Roadster is the sixth model to join the current line-up, based on the new Coupe, and is the first ever drop-top two-seater in the brand’s history. It sits some 20mm lower to the ground than the Mini convertible and gets a manually operated soft-top roof.

It’ll come in four varieties; the 122bhp Cooper Roadster, the 184bhp Cooper S, the 143bhp Cooper SD 2.0-litre diesel, and the firecracker 211bhp petrol John Cooper Works, complete with a 147mph top speed and a 0-62mph time of 6.5 seconds.

TopGear.com has all the deets

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Does it matter, then - and I keep being told that it does - that no one can mend their own car these days? Fifty years ago, any self-respecting bloke knew how to set the contact breakers on an Austin A35 blah blah blah and regrind the valves blah blah blah carburettor idle adjustment blah blah grease nipple.

But I’m getting slightly bored with old giffers saying things like: “Well, of course, in my day, when your car went wrong, you knew how to fix it yourself.” What they forget is that in their day, the car went wrong every 15 minutes.

The fact that no one can do this sort of thing any more is great news, because it shows how much better the car has become. People didn’t spend all that time under the bonnet for the purposes of self-improvement. They did it because their cars were crap. Now they’re better, and we can move on from the misery of the distributor cap.


James May on why it’s ok that nobody knows how to fix their own car anymore.

So what do you think? Do we not know how to fix our cars anymore because cars are better? Does it allow us to concentrate on better things? Or are we too dependent on the Jiffy Lube-Industrial Complex?

Read the rest at Top Gear.com

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